Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East book. Happy reading Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East Pocket Guide.

Bradley , Paperback Be the first to write a review. About this product. Stock photo. Brand new: lowest price The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging where packaging is applicable. See details. Buy It Now. Add to cart. Bradley , Paperback. Be the first to write a review About this product.

About this product Product Information The Middle East has long been something of a mystery to Westerners, and in particular, the sexual mores of the region continue to fascinate. Arabs are often described as being in a state of Islam-induced sexual anxiety and young Muslims' frustrations are said to be exacerbated by increasing exposure to the licentiousness of the West. Here, Middle East expert John R.

Unveiling the Middle East's sex industry

Bradley sets out to uncover the truth about sex in countries like Egypt, Syria, Morocco and Yemen. Among many startling revelations, Bradley reports on how "temporary" Islamic marriages allow for illicit sex in the theocracies of Iran and Saudi Arabia; "child brides" that are sold off to older Arab men according to ancient tribal traditions; the hypocrisy that undermines publicized crackdowns on the thriving sex industry in the Persian Gulf; and how, despite widespread denial, homosexuality is still deeply ingrained in the region's social fabric.

Richly detailed and nuanced, "Behind the Veil of Vice" sheds light on a taboo subject and unravels widely held myths about the region. In the process, Bradley also delivers an important message about our own society's contradictions. Additional Product Features Dewey Edition.

Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East

I decided to give the book two stars instead of one because, in spite of his insipid tone and snark, I did learn some things about the Middle East. Next time, however, I believe I will stick with someone who has conducted actual research. View 1 comment. Sep 22, Claire Webber rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Bradely is unafraid to be decisively opinionated about controversial topics, but backs every statement up with well-researched material and a kind, very human journalistic voice. The subject matter of sex, politics, religion, and hypocrisy is deftly batted between the Western and Arabic world.

If only the cover wasn't a perfect example of the Exotic Other, a poster-perfect example of Said's orientalism I worried that people thought I was reading a Harlequin Romance novel about a widowed sulta Bradely is unafraid to be decisively opinionated about controversial topics, but backs every statement up with well-researched material and a kind, very human journalistic voice. I worried that people thought I was reading a Harlequin Romance novel about a widowed sultan and his lovelorn au pair.

Jul 15, Samuel rated it liked it. As in his book on Saudi Arabia, Bradley demonstrates here a rare combination of first-hand experience, historical context and journalistic wherewithal that opens a lens into the usually hidden Muslim world. His singular focus on prostitution and its close cousins, such as temporary marriage, however, disappointingly narrows the field of view. For example, he skips over the entire realm of sexual culture that is not for sale, coming of age, infiltration of Western or Egyptian television and movie As in his book on Saudi Arabia, Bradley demonstrates here a rare combination of first-hand experience, historical context and journalistic wherewithal that opens a lens into the usually hidden Muslim world.

For example, he skips over the entire realm of sexual culture that is not for sale, coming of age, infiltration of Western or Egyptian television and movies with more liberal sexual attitudes, etc.


  • Leading Them to the Promised Land: Woodrow Wilson, Covenant Theology, and the Mexican Revolution, 1913–1915 (New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations).
  • (PDF) Writing Histories of Sexuality in the Middle East | Leslie Peirce - ajodenocah.ml.
  • The Mystery of Pain;
  • Dark Wish (The Dark Divinity Series Book 4).
  • Uncommon Rhythm.
  • Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East?
  • Branch Today, Gone Tomorrow.

He also dulls his insight by harping too many times on published allegations that prostitution in the Middle East necessarily involves trafficking in children or other slavery, rather than the [perhaps unfortunate] economic choices of adult women. He is probably correct, but it is an argument that only needs to be made once.

I hope in his next book, Bradley can shine his special light on a wider spectrum of the hidden Middle East. Jan 09, Zora O'Neill rated it it was ok. Suitably skeptical of human-trafficking panic. But veered weird in the last chapter when it dealt with homosexuality and rent boys, an issue clearly dear to the author's heart. I bought about half of his argument that Mid East attitudes toward gay sex and identity are better than Western ones, but then just got creeped out by the stridency of his writing.

It was also published in , meaning all the political analysis has been revealed as wrong. That actually made it more interesting, to be reminded how everything-we-believe-to-be-true Tunisia is heaven, especially can be upended overnight.

May 31, Richard rated it really liked it. Intriguing and well-written look at one of the most misunderstood topics. Pierces the media-driven myths and shows that outsider "do-gooders" such as feminists, homosexual activists, and various NGO's do much more harm than good, and how their interests even intersect with those of fundie nutters.

I did find his ridicule of Christian missionaries to be kind of odd, but overall a great read. Oct 18, Sharon Buchbinder rated it it was amazing Shelves: ethnographies , feminist , human-trafficking. Written by a seasoned journalist and correspondent, Beyond the Veil of Vice provides excellent insights into a culture many Westerners do not understand. I highly recommend this reflective and unflinching book for anyone interested in the role of women in the Middle East. Nov 12, Stefan rated it really liked it.

An interesting read that offers a point of view rarely heard in western media. There are no discussion topics on this book yet.

Unveiling the Middle East's sex industry | ajodenocah.ml

About John R. We bombed Iraq back into the Stone Age on the back of a pack of lies, have done nothing to bring to justice these war criminals who lead us, and at the same time feign concern and feel all superior when reading about the plight of Iraqi women working as prostitutes in Damascus. The issue has unhelpfully come to frame the debate about prostitution in the Middle East, as it has in the West, in the sense that if you advocate legalization and regulation you are accused of being by default in league with the human traffickers.

I found no evidence that human trafficking is widespread in the Middle East, and the statistics routinely quoted are almost always unsourced and often wildly contradictory. In the chapter on Bahrain's thriving sex industry, there's an account of a rather heated discussion I got into with a leading local human rights campaigner. He has long championed the cause of "saving" trafficked women forced into prostitution in Bahrain. However, when given the opportunity to state his case, he couldn't provide me with any verifiable evidence that there are any such women on the island.

Historically there has been very little. Indeed, quite the reverse. Only two references to prostitution are contained in the Islamic holy book. Both mention that four male witnesses are needed to convict a woman of the crime, and with the crucial proviso that anyone bringing false accusations would himself face severe punishment. In the early years of Islam the effect seems to have been that, so long as neither the man nor the woman was brazen about the activity, prostitution was more or less given free reign.

Behind the Veil of Vice: The Business and Culture of Sex in the Middle East

In fact, regulated, legal prostitution prospered throughout the Middle East. Brothels and red light districts were initially kept more or less secret, but the state surrendered to the inevitable and eventually they came out into the open.

Meeting with "Cannasexuals": Practicing Cannabis Intimacy

Egyptian prostitution was officially taxed as early as the tenth century, an example emulated in Andalusia and later in Syria and throughout much of the rest of the Ottoman Empire. The proliferation of Islamist political outfits in the wake of the Iranian revolution, criticizing Arab leaders for their alleged personal decadence and allowing Islamic societies to become so superficially Westernized, put the leaders more on the defensive. The Islamic opposition, like their anti-imperial forebears, highlighted corruption and loose morals as a cause of weakness.

My Shopping Bag

They are now fond of claiming that prostitution, like homosexuality, is a Western import. Rent boys are to be found everywhere in the Middle East, and homosexuality and prostitution are very much two sides of the same coin. Gay sex is as ubiquitous as the call to prayer, and for many men, of course, bedding a boy is a far more appealing prospect than bending over in the mosque, although being pulled in both directions, depending on the urge of the moment, must be quite normal too. From the malls of Jeddah to the souks of Marrakesh, from the main drag in Tunis to the downtown coffee shops in Amman, boys are available, for an agreed price, as they always have been.

In Damascus, there's an extraordinary local scene, where the major parks and downtown district are constant hives of cruising activity, day and night. The local gay guys, who have colonized all of the downtown cafes and the single bar, told me they were never harassed by the police or government, but they also said it was practically impossible to get gay sex without paying for it, especially with younger guys.

This scenario is replicated in other major urban centers in the region.